Test Kitchen for Change

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Test Kitchen for Change is a platform for engaging communities around the topic of healthy food systems. TKfC consists of participatory events with members of the community, produced in collaboration with local non-profit groups. The project aims to inspire people to embrace slow processes for preparing food. ?Test Kitchen for Change is the outcome of many months of research, small tests, hands-on learning, and discussions with designers, business owners, community leaders, and food system experts. The first bread-making event was held at the church in Baltimore on Nov. 2012. It is a graduate thesis investigation by Inna Alesina
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May 25, 2013
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The first bread-making event by the Test Kitchen for Change at the Brown Memorial Church in Baltimore on November 17, 2012
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The first bread-making event by the Test Kitchen for Change at the Brown Memorial Church in Baltimore on November 17, 2012
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Kids touch the bread dough at the bread-making event by the Test Kitchen for Change at the Brown Memorial Church in Baltimore on November 17, 2012
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Inna Alesina leading the baking demonstration at the bread-making event by the Test Kitchen for Change at the Brown Memorial Church in Baltimore on November 17, 2012
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A participant of the bread-making event by the Test Kitchen for Change picks up a baked bread at the Brown Memorial Church in Baltimore on November 18, 2012
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Bread is so basic that in some cultures it is compared to the life itself. It is a nutritious food, cultural and spiritual object. Mass-produced bread, is unhealthy for people and environment. Slow fermented bread leaven by natural yeast is healthy and easy to make.

 
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System of baking classes, events, and community supported bakery to allow participants so participants can engage in bread-making while taking classes or working. The slow fermentation process requires minimal labor input spread out in 3-4 hour intervals which can mesh with existing lunch and dinner breaks.